Browse Prior Art Database

Implementation of a Lateral Spring or Worm Gear for Micromachines

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000034959D
Original Publication Date: 1989-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Jan-28
Document File: 2 page(s) / 59K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Cote, WJ: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

A method for constructing micro springs and worm gears is shown. Known process steps are utilized to fabricate a micro lateral spring parallel to a substrate surface. Referring to Fig. 1, a material "A", such as oxide or paralyene, is defined into bars of predetermined height and spacing. Next, material "B" is defined which covers the bars of material "A". A process that produces a triangular shape, e.g., sputter etching, is used. Referring to the side view of Fig. 1, if a sinusoidal pattern is desired, a spun-on material may be used. Next, metal "C" is deposited and defined as shown in the top view of Fig. 1. The design is such that the metal line goes up and down over the topography as it goes from side to side. Finally, another material "D" is used to encapsulate the structure.

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Implementation of a Lateral Spring or Worm Gear for Micromachines

A method for constructing micro springs and worm gears is shown. Known process steps are utilized to fabricate a micro lateral spring parallel to a substrate surface. Referring to Fig. 1, a material "A", such as oxide or paralyene, is defined into bars of predetermined height and spacing. Next, material "B" is defined which covers the bars of material "A". A process that produces a triangular shape, e.g., sputter etching, is used. Referring to the side view of Fig. 1, if a sinusoidal pattern is desired, a spun-on material may be used. Next, metal "C" is deposited and defined as shown in the top view of Fig. 1. The design is such that the metal line goes up and down over the topography as it goes from side to side. Finally, another material "D" is used to encapsulate the structure. Materials "D", "B" and "A" are selectively and appropriately removed in the spring area or where desired, leaving the spring free with the desired degree of freedom. Metal "C" is not removed when etching the surrounding oxides "D","B" and "A". Outside the spring area other materials have been defined but left intact during the removal of oxides that surround the spring. These areas can be used to anchor one end of the spring while the other end is left free to move. Also, a material can be used to "encase" the top of the spring if it covered material "D" in certain areas prior to removal of the surrounding oxide. By utili...