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Rule Thickness and Cell Depth in Tables

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000035080D
Original Publication Date: 1989-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Jan-28
Document File: 4 page(s) / 72K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

King, KS: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

This article describes a method for determining the thickness of lines, as well as the depth of cells, in ruled tables constructed on all- points-addressable printers.

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Rule Thickness and Cell Depth in Tables

This article describes a method for determining the thickness of lines, as well as the depth of cells, in ruled tables constructed on all- points-addressable printers.

Table construction has been implemented in document composition computer programs. Many cell characteristics can be defined by the user. Two such characteristics are the thickness of the rules (lines) surrounding the cell and the depth of the cell. The values of these characteristics assigned to one cell affect surrounding cells. The described method manages these interactions without requiring further intervention by the user.

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The method employs a structure called an ICR (internal cell representation) and two algorithms. In the description and algorithms, the following terms are used: node and line. A node is one unit of the table layout structure. For example, the following table layout structure 1 3 2 1 4 2 describes the table shown in Fig. 1. This table layout structure contains six nodes. Two of the nodes comprise cell 1, two nodes comprise cell 2, one node comprises cell 3, and one node comprises cell 4.

A line is a horizontal concatenation of the nodes in a table layout structure. All lines within a single table layout structure will contain the same number of nodes. In the above example, there are two lines in the table layout structure. A line is discernable by splitting the table layout structure into individual horizontal strings of numbers. From the table layout structure above, 1 3 2 comprises the first line in the table layout structure, and 1 4 2 comprises the second line.

The ICR consists of information for each node in the table layout structure and additional information for each line in the table layout structure. The ICR contains the following information for each node in the table layout structure: (1) the address of the node to the right (indicated in Fig. 2 by an arrow pointing to the right); (2) the address of the node to the left (indicated in Fig. 2 by an arrow pointing to the left); (3) the address of the node above (indicated in Fig. 2 by an arrow pointing upward); (4) the address of the node below (indicated in Fig. 2 by an arrow pointing downward); (5) the position the node occupies in the cell (top, bottom, left, right (indicated in Fig. 2 by T, B, L, and R, respectively). (If a node occupies a bottom position in the cell, it is termed a "bottom boundary" node; the same nomenclature applies to the top, right, and left positions.); (6) the depth of the node; (7) the depth the node needs to be adjusted; (8) the rule to use on the right of this node; and, (9) the rule to use below this node.

The ICR contains the following information for each line in the table layout structure: (a) the address of the next line in the table layout structure (indicated in Fig. 2 by an arrow pointing downward); (b) the address of the first node in the line (indicated in Fig. 2 by an arrow pointing to th...