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Method of Controlling Movable Components, Especially the Protective Door of a Banking Machine, Meeting Safety Criteria

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000035083D
Original Publication Date: 1989-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Jan-28
Document File: 3 page(s) / 51K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Link, S: AUTHOR

Abstract

A protective door is used for banking machines, such as cash units. In the closed state, for example, it covers the cash gate, the keyboard and the screen to protect them against vandalism and contamination.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
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Method of Controlling Movable Components, Especially the Protective Door of a Banking Machine, Meeting Safety Criteria

A protective door is used for banking machines, such as cash units. In the closed state, for example, it covers the cash gate, the keyboard and the screen to protect them against vandalism and contamination.

The motor used to close and open the door must be sufficiently strong to permit opening the door if it gets jammed by frost. On the other hand, the motor must be so "sensitive" that objects, such as fingers, do not get stuck in the door. The control means provided ensure that environmental influences, such as short- term contamination caused, for instance, by drifting sand in coastal regions, do not lead to functional defects.

The motor used for this purpose is a 25 V DC motor with a timing disk with two sensors and a switch determining the home position of the door. The motor may be designed for, e.g., 16 different voltages. The control sequence is realized in microcode.

Speed control prevents fingers from getting stuck in the door. In response to a leading or trailing pulse edge, the timing disk supplies a signal defining an interval (step) of a predetermined length (in this case a door travel of about 0.22 mm). This travel is always constant.

The combination of this travel with a microcode-controlled timer yields a speed value. If the timed value runs out before a new signal is received from the timing disk, the door speed was too low, and the microcode detects an obstacle. In response, the timer triggers an interrupt, and the program branches immediately to a supervisory routine. If an obstacle is detected, the door is moved in the opposite direction, the obstacle is released, and retries are initiated. If no obstacle is detected, the timer is reinitialized with the current speed limit following each signal of the timer disk. The retries can be carried out at increased motor voltage, so that more power is available to overcome, for example, contamination.

The functional sequence for closing the door is described below with reference to Figs. 1 and 2.

Fig. 1 shows the detection of an obstacle at the maximum limit and Fig. 2 at an adapted limit, with the speed values being shown as a function of the number of steps. Plot 1 shows the actual speed curve of the door. At the start of each door movement, the c...