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Browse Prior Art Database

Optimal Acceleration of the Carrier in a High-Speed Printer

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000035118D
Original Publication Date: 1989-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-09
Document File: 2 page(s) / 9K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Hoang, CM: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Disclosed is a technique for acceleration of the carrier in a high-speed printer.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 53% of the total text.

Page 1 of 2

Optimal Acceleration of the Carrier in a High-Speed Printer

Disclosed is a technique for acceleration of the carrier in a high-speed printer.

   U.S. Patent 4,270,868 describes a transport system where velocity is controlled using digital feedback from an optical encoder. In such control schemes the voltage applied to a DC motor is dynamically controlled to produce prescribed velocity profiles. Further enhancements of this technique provide a method for calculating a voltage "offset" parameter. This parameter is an indication of how much the system has deviated from nominal over time. Prior to the present work, the "offset" parameter was only used during constant-velocity control to make adaptive changes to velocity.

   In a high-speed high-acceleration printer, the following design criteria are important considerations:

I - The temperature increased due to normal operation of the system in high- speed modes reduces the efficiency of the transport motor to such a degree that reliable acceleration of the carrier cannot be guaranteed. In addition, parts and manufacturing tolerances are very critical due to low-cost requirements which dictate a minimum design margin. It is therefore necessary to design a method by which the acceleration functions can be adapted automatically.

II - Because of high acceleration requirements, it is important to keep the derivative of acceleration (mechanical jerk) to a minimum and at zero if possible. Not only will print registration accuracy be compromised, but due to print-head fire rate restrictions, print density will also suffer if carrier speed is not sufficiently stable by the time the first print point is reached. In addition, the acoustic impli...