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Display Depth Cueing by Software

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000035150D
Original Publication Date: 1989-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Jan-28
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Galton, BN: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Depth cueing makes a three-dimensional graphics picture appear to be more realistic by dimming those parts further from the viewer and is normally accomplished by hardware. Here, software static coding in all three spatial dimensions using color or some other multidimensional visual code indicates depth. As all three dimensions are included, the visual effect persists when the picture is rotated.

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Display Depth Cueing by Software

Depth cueing makes a three-dimensional graphics picture appear to be more realistic by dimming those parts further from the viewer and is normally accomplished by hardware. Here, software static coding in all three spatial dimensions using color or some other multidimensional visual code indicates depth. As all three dimensions are included, the visual effect persists when the picture is rotated.

Depth cueing has been implemented in software, in the past, by pre-dimming the appropriate vectors. The resulting picture is only correctly cued from one viewing direction, and it becomes invalid as the object is rotated on the screen. However, this technique provides assistance in visualizing the object even when reversed; i.e., when the dimmer lines are nearer the viewer. This is not realistic, but neither is real depth cueing. The perceptual mechanism by which depth cueing is effective is not as simple as the textbooks suggest.

The problem with existing pre-depth-cued vectors is that, although the cueing works well either right-way-around or, as stated above, back-to-front, it is not effective when the object is sideways on. The bright vectors are in one half of the picture, the dim ones in the other, and there is, of course, no back-to-front difference at all. We propose a technique, in which different properties of the vectors are perturbed in different spatial directions. For instance, red, green and blue components of color could b...