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Process for Thin Film Growth of Oxide Superconductors

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000035223D
Original Publication Date: 1989-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Jan-28
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Gallagher, WJ: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Certain oxide materials have been shown to exhibit superconductivity at high temperatures (e.g., BaLaCuO, SrLaCuO, YBaCuO, TlBaCaCuO and BiSrCaCuO). Also of interest is the relatively low electron density. Deposition of these materials in thin film form is made difficult by the number of constituents and the need for oxygen since the superconducting properties are very sensitive to small deficiency of oxygen.

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Process for Thin Film Growth of Oxide Superconductors

Certain oxide materials have been shown to exhibit superconductivity at high temperatures (e.g., BaLaCuO, SrLaCuO, YBaCuO, TlBaCaCuO and BiSrCaCuO). Also of interest is the relatively low electron density. Deposition of these materials in thin film form is made difficult by the number of constituents and the need for oxygen since the superconducting properties are very sensitive to small deficiency of oxygen.

Multi-constituent films can be deposited by sputtering and evaporation, either from alloy sources or using multiple sources. The use of multiple sources is the most generally applicable and flexible. The quasiternary compounds, such as YBa2Cu3O7, can be deposited from three sources consisting of oxides (or other suitable compounds) of Y, Ba, and Cu. Unfortunately, both evaporation and sputtering tend to result in oxygen deficient films. In addition, there is no adequate means for varying oxygen concentration in simple three-source deposition. In sputtering, oxygen is conveniently added to the inert background gas. However, production of uniform films in a three source system is much easier with evaporation than with sputtering. The addition of oxygen in evaporation is often unsuccessful because it is difficult to incorporate sufficient oxygen into films at the low pressures used in evaporation, especially with electron beam evaporation. This difficulty is overcome by supplying oxygen in the form of an ion...