Browse Prior Art Database

Single Cycle Drive

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000035287D
Original Publication Date: 1989-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Jan-28
Document File: 2 page(s) / 44K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Cahill, DP: AUTHOR

Abstract

This invention enables a motor to drive an element for one revolution and have the element stop while the motor continues to drive other elements. The specific use is to drive a "D"-shaped roller in a paper- handling mechanism initially for one revolution to start the movement of one piece of paper. The motor will continue to drive the paper through a gear train and pinch rollers during and after the revolution of the "D"-shaped roller.

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Single Cycle Drive

This invention enables a motor to drive an element for one revolution and have the element stop while the motor continues to drive other elements. The specific use is to drive a "D"-shaped roller in a paper- handling mechanism initially for one revolution to start the movement of one piece of paper. The motor will continue to drive the paper through a gear train and pinch rollers during and after the revolution of the "D"-shaped roller.

A drive gear 1 is driven counterclockwise by input shaft 2 and together they continuously drive pinch rollers 3 through gear train 3a, and the pinch rollers 3 feed paper sheets 4. On every revolution, drive latch 6 molded into drive gear 1 is moved axially away from "D" roller 5 by the interaction of latch surface 6 and motor bracket 7. This enables the drive gear 1 to rotate while the "D" roller 5 is held stationary by the interference between backcheck latch 8 and motor bracket
7.

To drive the "D" roller 5, the input shaft 2 and the drive gear 1 are driven clockwise which allows the latch surface 6 of the drive latch 4 to move past the interference point of the motor bracket 7 without experiencing any axial movement. The drive latch 4 is axially deformed by its interference with the cam surface 9 of the "D" roller 5 and is stopped by latch surface 10 coacting against surface 11 on "D" roller 5. If a stepper motor is used, the motor can be homed by trying to drive the mechanism in the clockwise direction. This...