Browse Prior Art Database

Printer Band Tensioning and Tracking Mechanism

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000035382D
Original Publication Date: 1989-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Jan-28
Document File: 2 page(s) / 55K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Gregory, FA: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

An inexpensive non-adjustable drive arrangement for a print band is achieved by using drive and idler pulleys of similar surface contours on fixed centers with a tensioning and tracking shoe that urges the band toward pulley aligning flanges.

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Printer Band Tensioning and Tracking Mechanism

An inexpensive non-adjustable drive arrangement for a print band is achieved by using drive and idler pulleys of similar surface contours on fixed centers with a tensioning and tracking shoe that urges the band toward pulley aligning flanges.

In Fig. 1, print band 4, with embossed characters on its outer surface, is driven by drive pulley 5 about idler pulley 6 over shoe 7 on pivot block 8 and urged by spring 9 against the inner surface of the band. The two pulleys have an identical flange 10 and a crowned surface 11 on which the band runs, best seen in Fig. 2. The crown is nearer the flange side of the pulleys. Shoe 7 is a combined tensioning and tracking element and has a sloped contact surface 12, shown in Fig. 3. Pivot block 8 is allowed to slide in mounting surface 14.

In operation, band 4 attempts to center itself on the crown and is driven against the flanges for precise running location. By mounting the pulleys on fixed centers, they can be located with acceptable accuracy. Shoe 7 provides band tension through spring 9, lubrication through its material, and steering bias through pressure on the looser edge of the band at entry of the band onto idler pulley 6. Steering bias is required to overcome band tension variations due to welding tolerances and etching and internal stress variations.

Steering bias is made possible by allowing shoe 7 and pivot on pivot block 8 through pin 13.

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