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Metal/Polyimide Adhesion Improvement by Metal Deposition With Ion Bombardment

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000035390D
Original Publication Date: 1989-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Jan-28
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Hahn, PO: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

Packaging technology requires that metal/polyimide contacts be made with good mechanical and thermal stability. Many approaches are used to provide good adhesion between the metal and polyimide, but often other problems (such as high contact resistance) develop. In the present technique, adhesion is enhanced by substantial atomic mixing of metal and polyimide across the interfacial region. Ion bombardment is used for this purpose.

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Metal/Polyimide Adhesion Improvement by Metal Deposition With Ion Bombardment

Packaging technology requires that metal/polyimide contacts be made with good mechanical and thermal stability. Many approaches are used to provide good adhesion between the metal and polyimide, but often other problems (such as high contact resistance) develop. In the present technique, adhesion is enhanced by substantial atomic mixing of metal and polyimide across the interfacial region. Ion bombardment is used for this purpose.

A thin metal layer of the order of 10-100 Ao is first deposited on the polyimide surface. The surface is then ion bombarded, with inert or reactive species. The mass recoil will force some of the metal atoms into the polyimide surface, with a higher efficiency for heavier metal atoms. Since the metal atoms are reactive, they are effective in causing the chemical changes which increase adhesion. This includes the case of reactive ion bombardment and/or interfacial mixing of metal and polyimide.

This technique is applicable with suitable choice of gases for most of the metals used in packaging, and in particular Cu, Ni, Cr, Al, etc. Gases that can be used include the inert ones, such as Ar or reactive gases, such as oxygen, nitrogen, etc.

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