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Liquid Crystal Display "Super-Cube" for Three-Dimensional Display Applications

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000035401D
Original Publication Date: 1989-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Jan-28
Document File: 3 page(s) / 122K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Fisher, JO: AUTHOR [+5]

Abstract

A technique is described whereby a liquid crystal display (LCD) module, (referred herein as the "Super-Cube"), provides three-dimensional (3-D) viewing for display applications, such as those used in the making of computer generated designs (CAD, CADAM). Described is the construction of the "Super-Cube" and associated circuitry required for operation. (Image Omitted)

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Liquid Crystal Display "Super-Cube" for Three-Dimensional Display Applications

A technique is described whereby a liquid crystal display (LCD) module, (referred herein as the "Super-Cube"), provides three-dimensional (3-D) viewing for display applications, such as those used in the making of computer generated designs (CAD, CADAM). Described is the construction of the "Super-Cube" and associated circuitry required for operation.

(Image Omitted)

The 3-D LCD display module is designed to display features, such as X, Y and Z graphics, and can be used in typical cut, paste and magnification applications. In addition to displaying 3-D, the device and its circuitry have the ability to display information, such as the availability of the data sets involved in geometric vector graphic designs. It is designed so that it can be decoupled and transported away from the computer which generated the display information while powered by battery backup.

For the purpose of discussion, a 16x16x16 array, as shown in Fig. 1, is chosen for this description and ease of visualization; however, the "Super-Cube" could be larger or smaller as required. For example, a 256x256x256 array could be similarly constructed, but would typically use a 16-megabit memory chip and an 8-bit to 256-line demultiplexer.

"Super-Cube" LCD cube 1, as shown in Fig. 1, is composed of a 3-D array of LCD pixels where all wiring and electrical plates required for the LCD pixels are thinly fabricated, so as to be as transparent as possible when viewing the pixels. This allows 3-D pictures to be viewed as representations of physical objects. All non-transparent circuitry is enclosed in base 3. This enables viewing from five sides.

Input to the module is supplied at microprocessor 4 and pixel information is stored in memory chip 5. Four lines are provided for each of the output coordinates; Z coordinate 6, X coordinate to demultiplexer 7, and Y coordinate to demultiplexer 8. Input information is sent to microprocessor 4 from an external device, such as a personal computer. Microprocessor 4 performs the actual bit manipulations for rotations, translations and scaling. The drawing input from an external device can be sent to the microprocessor via an infrared link to module
18. The information is formatted as sixteen bits, where each sixteen bit input describes a 3-D point and a defining operation. Four bits define each of the X, Y, and Z positions, while the remaining four bits define the operation. The unit is powered by battery 19. Joystick 20 can be used instead of, or in addition to, the external device to control rotations, translations and scaling. The base unit communicates with the joystick through an infrared link 21. The base unit communicates with the external device through another infrared link 22.

The four bits defining the operation control how the microprocessor modifies the bits in memory. Bit-1 defines whether the X, Y, or Z position is relative or absolute. Bit-2 de...