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Adaptive Mechanism to prevent Real Time Software Application from Processor Overloading

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000035634D
Original Publication Date: 2005-Feb-25
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-25
Document File: 1 page(s) / 18K

Publishing Venue

Siemens

Related People

Juergen Carstens: CONTACT

Abstract

Multitasking Operating Systems provide the possibility to set priorities on tasks. A high priority task is activated more frequently than a low priority task. In current Multitasking Operating Systems the priority of a task is not changed dynamically. This results in a not highly efficient system under conditions when the system load is high. The here proposed method provides a more efficient usage of system resources and guarantees to a task a certain ability to respond to external events.

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Adaptive Mechanism to prevent Real Time Software Application from Processor Overloading

Idea: Vitaly Margolin, IL-Hod HaSharon

Multitasking Operating Systems provide the possibility to set priorities on tasks. A high priority task is activated more frequently than a low priority task. In current Multitasking Operating Systems the priority of a task is not changed dynamically. This results in a not highly efficient system under conditions when the system load is high.

The here proposed method provides a more efficient usage of system resources and guarantees to a task a certain ability to respond to external events.

A networking task (TARGET-task) is considered to process some external events, for example incoming packets, that can occur in a wide range of frequencies even at very high frequency. We introduce two additional tasks: The first with a very low priority (LP-task), i.e. with the lowest priority in the system. The other task has got the highest priority in the system (HP-task). The only thing the LP- task does is incrementing a counter. The HP-task is activated by the system timer once per an adjusted time interval. When activated the HP-task retrieves the value of the counter of the LP-task. Then the HP-task calculates the difference (DELTA) relative to the last retrieval. DELTA is sent to the TARGET-task. The TARGET-task uses a predefined/pre-calibrated function f(DELTA) that represents a certain measure of frequency of incoming events that are to be...