Browse Prior Art Database

Weighted Random Pattern Distributed Signature Generation

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000035662D
Original Publication Date: 1989-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Jan-28
Document File: 2 page(s) / 76K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Motika, F: AUTHOR

Abstract

A unique technique for hardware signature generation with redundancy for masking error reduction is described in this article. The disclosed concept also offers a capability for minimizing the volume of diagnostic test data involved by allowing comparative logic and diagnostics tests to be performed on the same test set up. (Image Omitted)

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Weighted Random Pattern Distributed Signature Generation

A unique technique for hardware signature generation with redundancy for masking error reduction is described in this article. The disclosed concept also offers a capability for minimizing the volume of diagnostic test data involved by allowing comparative logic and diagnostics tests to be performed on the same test set up.

(Image Omitted)

The technique to be described forms an integral part of a Weighted Random Pattern (WRP) test system for large VLSI logic structures based on Level- Sensitive Scan Design (LSSD) methodology. With this methodology (referring to Fig. 1) large numbers of WRPs are applied to the Device Under Test (DUT) 1 whose output responses are compressed into the signature analysis sub-system described in this article. While the disclosed concept is here identified with a WRP test system, the basic idea applies to general test system signature analysis and diagnostic techniques.

Three distinct hardware functions are incorporated into the distributed signature generation concept illustrated by Fig. 1. The first function is the broadside Multiple Input Signature Register (MISR) 2, its expected signature stack 3 and signal comparator 4. The second is the individual LSSD shift register (SISR) 5, its associated signature stack 6 and signal comparator 7. The third is the Serial Real Time Buffer (SRTB) for response collection and acquisition selector. These three functions jointly form an integral part of the output response collection subsys...