Browse Prior Art Database

Bar Code Scanning With Reduced Sensitivity to Label Orientation

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000035676D
Original Publication Date: 1989-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Jan-28
Document File: 3 page(s) / 52K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Dickson, LD: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Fig. 1 shows a bar code label representative of the AIAG (Automotive Industry Action Group) Shipping/Parts Identification Label to be widely used in the automotive industry. The AIAG Committee has decreed that this label must be read in the so-called "picket fence" orientation. That is, the label must be placed on boxes and parts so that each bar code in the label can be read by a horizontally scanning beam. In general, this means the overall AIAG label, must be scanned by a raster scan pattern.

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Bar Code Scanning With Reduced Sensitivity to Label Orientation

Fig. 1 shows a bar code label representative of the AIAG (Automotive Industry Action Group) Shipping/Parts Identification Label to be widely used in the automotive industry. The AIAG Committee has decreed that this label must be read in the so-called "picket fence" orientation. That is, the label must be placed on boxes and parts so that each bar code in the label can be read by a horizontally scanning beam. In general, this means the overall AIAG label, must be scanned by a raster scan pattern.

A raster scan pattern could be produced by a rotating, multi- faceted polygonal-mirror scanner with individual facets tilted at different angles relative to the rotational axis of the polygon. A rotating holographic scanning disk could also produce a raster scan pattern.

In general, individual codes in the AIAG label have a relatively small height- to-length ratio. If the labels are tilted slightly, the code may no longer be readable with horizontal scan lines since it may no longer be possible for a single scan line to pass through the entire code (see Fig. 2). It would be desirable to provide some degree of orientation flexibility on the placement of the label by creating a scan pattern which scans both on the horizontal and several degrees off of the horizontal. Fig. 3 shows a suitable three-line scan pattern.

(Image Omitted)

Fig. 4 shows a second way of achieving the same effect. Since the label moves left to right (or right to left) through the scanning beams, the overall reading effect of the scan pattern of Fig. 4 is the same as that of Fig. 3.

It is possible, using either a holog...