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Laser-Jet Electrochemical Micromachining in Neutral Chloride Solution

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000035731D
Original Publication Date: 1989-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Jan-28
Document File: 2 page(s) / 151K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Datta, M: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

Neutral salt solutions are commonly used in electrochemical machining of large metallic pieces *. In the present invention it is shown that a laser-jet, i.e., an electrolytic jet employing a neutral sodium chloride solution together with a collinearly directed laser beam through the same nozzle results in high-speed and high-resolution maskless electrochemical micromachining. In the present configuration very high current densities can be employed; hence, very high rates of metal removal can be achieved.

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Laser-Jet Electrochemical Micromachining in Neutral Chloride Solution

Neutral salt solutions are commonly used in electrochemical machining of large metallic pieces *. In the present invention it is shown that a laser-jet, i.e., an electrolytic jet employing a neutral sodium chloride solution together with a collinearly directed laser beam through the same nozzle results in high-speed and high-resolution maskless electrochemical micromachining. In the present configuration very high current densities can be employed; hence, very high rates of metal removal can be achieved.

Incorporation of a laser beam into the electrolytic jet has no significant influence on the dissolution current efficiency of nickel and steel in the chloride solution. On the other hand, by using a laser-jet as opposed to the jet alone, the stray cutting is minimized significantly thereby greatly increasing the effective machining performance. The utility of this invention is shown in Fig. 1. Fig. 1a is a scanning electron microphotograph of the micromachined hole resulting from jet alone, and Fig. 1b, for the laser-jet hole. The metal dissolution in Fig. 1a extends beyond the diameter of the jet leading to overcutting. In contrast, Fig. 1b indicates that the material in this case is concentrated in the region of the incident laser-jet. Both cases result in equal weight loss for the passage of the same amount of charge. Hence, a system is described for localizing the region of micromachining b...