Browse Prior Art Database

Analog/Digital Signal Transmission and Control Using Fiber Optics

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000035750D
Original Publication Date: 1989-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Jan-28
Document File: 2 page(s) / 68K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Machlbacher, JC: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

A technique is described whereby analog-to-digital and digital-to- analog conversion signals, as used in remote data acquisition applications, are transmitted through the use of fiber optics and associated control circuitry to provide immunity to electrical noise for improved operational performance. (Image Omitted)

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Analog/Digital Signal Transmission and Control Using Fiber Optics

A technique is described whereby analog-to-digital and digital-to- analog conversion signals, as used in remote data acquisition applications, are transmitted through the use of fiber optics and associated control circuitry to provide immunity to electrical noise for improved operational performance.

(Image Omitted)

The use of the analog-to-digital converter (ADC) and the digital- to-analog converter (DAC) located either remotely from a digital computer, or within a computer, will have performance limitations due to interference from electrical noise. To overcome the electrical noise, particularly where wired interconnections are used, special isolation techniques were required to interconnect the devices electrically. In an effort to reduce electrical noise, without the need for special isolation techniques, the concept described herein utilizes fiber-optic technology and associated control circuitry to provide improved signal transmission performance in the areas of speed, resolution, acquisition time and system integration.

In prior art, when ADC and DAC units are located within the computer, the analog signals are typically transmitted and received from a remote location, as shown in Fig. 1, such that electrical noise will affect the performance of the analog signals which is generally induced magnetically, or directly through power supplies. When ADC and DAC units are located at the remote location, as shown in Fig. 2, the digital signals are also subjected to electrical noise and can have a deteriorating effect on signal switching performance, although methods to minimizes these problems, such as in t...