Browse Prior Art Database

Watch With Patterns for Visually Impaired

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000035772D
Original Publication Date: 1989-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Jan-28
Document File: 4 page(s) / 147K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Kesling, DP: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

This article describes a method of producing vivid images on a radial output device such as a watch. Moire circles and rotating shaded areas are used to increase the visual area. This serves as an aid to the visually impaired in reading the unit. (Image Omitted)

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 54% of the total text.

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Watch With Patterns for Visually Impaired

This article describes a method of producing vivid images on a radial output device such as a watch. Moire circles and rotating shaded areas are used to increase the visual area. This serves as an aid to the visually impaired in reading the unit.

(Image Omitted)

Dial analog readouts, such as a watch, altimeters and directional indicators typically use a narrow pointing arrow to indicate the intended visual output. This can be difficult to read for the visually handicapped and in high stress situations. The device described in this article uses large darkened areas and moire circles to produce an improved visual effect for the user.

Described here is a watch with rotating shaded areas and moire circles. The principles used can be extended to any visual output device. Fig. 1 shows a watch 1 that has a series of concentric circles 2 on the inner surface. The center of these circles is offset from the center of rotation for the device.

The minute hand for this watch consists of concentric circles 3 that are identical to the concentric circles on the inner surface of the base. These circles are offset from the center of rotation and exactly overlap the circles on the base at the start of each hour. Thus, the pattern is pure circles exactly on the hour, and visually distinct moire circles are present for a few minutes before and after each hour. The moire circles produced during other parts of the hour are visually distinct from the period described.

The minute hand includes a large shaded area 4 that is easy for the eye to detect. It consists of a shaded half circle with a pointer 5. The user can briefly look at the large shaded semicircle, and even if it is not clear, the semicircle immediately registers in the mind. Thus, the user readily knows the time. The large area allows the shaded image to be detectable in the eye longer than the user is looking at the watch, thus, he can quickly loo...