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Browse Prior Art Database

Cut-Sheet Vapor Fuser

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000035786D
Original Publication Date: 1989-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Jan-28
Document File: 2 page(s) / 48K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Janssen, DM: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

This vapor fuser relates to the use of vapor fusing in cut-sheet copier and printer reproduction devices, particularly duplexing reproduction devices wherein a single pass through the fuser fixes the image on both sides of the sheet.

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Cut-Sheet Vapor Fuser

This vapor fuser relates to the use of vapor fusing in cut-sheet copier and printer reproduction devices, particularly duplexing reproduction devices wherein a single pass through the fuser fixes the image on both sides of the sheet.

A problem encountered in the use of vapor fusing is contamination of the room with fusing vapors. This problem can be more pronounced when fusing a duplex sheet, because the sheet must be "floated" into a high concentration vapor zone.

Fig. 1 is a side view of the vapor fuser. Inlet air bearing 10 is designed to be a stiff, low flow bearing, preferably made of porous material. The bearing effectively supports the paper only when the paper comes into close proximity of the bearing surface. Because bearing 10 is designed to be stiff, curl in the paper, or curvature in the air bearing, can be tolerated under certain conditions without the sheet's toner contacting a bearing surface.

A high percentage of the bearing's airflow escapes into the room environment. In order to reduce room contamination, the air fed to air bearing 10 is provided by the arrangement shown in Fig. 2. Air steam 20 from dryer 13 of Fig. 1 (comprising moderate solvent concentrations) enters chamber 21. Chamber 21 is separated into two compartments 22 and 23 by membrane 24. Vacuum pump 25 establishes a negative pressure in chamber 23. As a result, air stream 26 flowing to bearing 10 is reduced to a low percentage of about 1% solvent. Solvent leak...