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Browse Prior Art Database

Disk-Sensing Multi-Disk Robot Tool

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000035806D
Original Publication Date: 1989-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Jan-28
Document File: 5 page(s) / 132K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Dingfelder, DW: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

A tool which will locate the pallet accurately (in 3D), will hold five disks at a time, and will load and unload each of the five disks with error detection-sensing built into the tool is described.

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Disk-Sensing Multi-Disk Robot Tool

A tool which will locate the pallet accurately (in 3D), will hold five disks at a time, and will load and unload each of the five disks with error detection-sensing built into the tool is described.

The application requires the robot to load each of the five disks into a hole with a tolerance of about .2 mm. The gripper consists of

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several components, as seen in Fig. 1. An aluminum bracket 1 is used for extending the tool from the robot arm. A stainless steel plate 2 is used to affix the two DELRON* quarter-cylinder disk-holding pieces and optical sensors. Five optical beam break sensors 3 are positioned so that when the disk is seated properly in the tool, the beam is broken. The raising up of the disk is sensed when the beam becomes unobstructed. Improper disk loading is then detected by lowering the disk into the pallet hole groove to a point where the disk should not have risen to, and then verifying this state with the sensor. If the sensor detects premature disk lift, the load position is wrong.

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These sensors also detect improper unload as the disk never becomes seated in the tool disk slot, and insure that the tool does not bind when putting disks away into a rigid cassette. This is achieved by making sure that all five beams become unblocked at about the same time. If one or more of the beams remain blocked, this indicates that a disk is caught in the gripper and the robot corrects this situation.

A bracket 4 holds the pallet location sensors. An infrared fiber- optic retro- reflective sensor 5 is used in locating the pallet. The robot moves this sensor about the edge of the pallet hole to locate a point on the hole edge. The sensor has a sensitivity spot for fine adjustment.

An electrical contact probe 6 is used for locating the pallet. The robot positions the contact probe until it is at the exact point of contact with the pallet and then uses this position in locating the pallet. Two DELRON plastic quar...