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Spring Bellows Vibration Isolator

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000035823D
Original Publication Date: 1989-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Jan-28
Document File: 2 page(s) / 56K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Duerig, UT: AUTHOR

Abstract

A vibration-damping system is disclosed providing both low-frequency damping and excellent high-frequency vibration rejection in a single unit. The system is ideally suited for ultra-high vacuum work since no organic materials are exposed to the high vacuum side. The set up is shown in Fig. 1. It is similar to a spring suspension system with the spring being replaced by a stainless steel bellows 1 fitted with a CF35 conflat flange 2 at one end for mounting in a UHV chamber and a hook 3 at the other end providing a mount for the load. The exterior of the bellows 1 is exposed to UHV while the interior is filled with a viscous damping material 4 and evacuated in order to cancel excessive load due to pressure difference. (Image Omitted)

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Spring Bellows Vibration Isolator

A vibration-damping system is disclosed providing both low-frequency damping and excellent high-frequency vibration rejection in a single unit. The system is ideally suited for ultra-high vacuum work since no organic materials are exposed to the high vacuum side. The set up is shown in Fig. 1. It is similar to a spring suspension system with the spring being replaced by a stainless steel bellows 1 fitted with a CF35 conflat flange 2 at one end for mounting in a UHV chamber and a hook 3 at the other end providing a mount for the load. The exterior of the bellows 1 is exposed to UHV while the interior is filled with a viscous damping material 4 and evacuated in order to cancel excessive load due to pressure difference.

(Image Omitted)

Vibrations excited at the mounting flange 2 propagate along the bellows 1 as compression waves of the lamellar structure. During propagation, energy is constantly dissipated since the motion of the lamella is hampered by the viscous filling material 4. At low frequency, where absorption is negligible, the bellows 1 acts like a conventional spring stage. With increasing frequency, however, vibration isolation becomes dramatically superior. It can be shown that in the high-frequency limit, vibration rejection is of the order exp(-!-l) for the spring bellows 1, as compared to 1/l for a conventional design. Fig. 2 shows the transfer function calculated for the particular spring bellows 1 sketched in Fig....