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METHOD FOR GROWING HIGH Ge CONTENT COMMENSURATE LAYERS ON Si

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000035900D
Original Publication Date: 1989-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Jan-28
Document File: 2 page(s) / 99K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Ganin, E: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Disclosed is an approach for obtaining high Ge content SiGe layers on Si which are commensurate at thicknesses beyond the critical limit for such growth.

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METHOD FOR GROWING HIGH Ge CONTENT COMMENSURATE LAYERS ON Si

Disclosed is an approach for obtaining high Ge content SiGe layers on Si which are commensurate at thicknesses beyond the critical limit for such growth.

Commensurate Si-Ge layers have many potential applications in novel device structures. Some of these applications require a high Ge concentration. Unfortunately, the high misfit and interfacial energy associated with layers of high Ge content limits the thickness of such layers. For example, a 50% Ge layer may only be grown to a thickness of less than 7 nm. This is inadequate for several applications.

In this disclosure, an approach is described for obtaining commensurate SiGe layers beyond critical thickness limits. To obtain such a layer, a low concentration (about 15% Ge) commensurate Si-Ge layer is grown using low temperature epitaxial techniques (i.e., molecular beam epitaxy). This layer is subsequently oxidized (i.e., 800oC, steam), either with or without an oxide cap. The oxidation treatment leads to the selective formation of SiO2 and an interfacial enrichment of Ge, well above that permitted by theory. The RBS profile of Fig. 1 shows the Ge enrichment at the interface, while the XTEM micrograph of Fig. 2 shows the perfection of one such layer containing more than 70% Ge. The amount of enrichment may be controlled by the extent of oxidation.

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