Browse Prior Art Database

Computer and Peripheral Device Pole Stand

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000035914D
Original Publication Date: 1989-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Jan-28
Document File: 4 page(s) / 57K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Pickover, C: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Disclosed is a stand for personal computers and peripherals. The stand resembles a pole lamp. The peripherals are placed on arms protruding from the central pole. Cables are internal to the pole. The central bus architecture of the pole is discussed.

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Computer and Peripheral Device Pole Stand

Disclosed is a stand for personal computers and peripherals. The stand resembles a pole lamp. The peripherals are placed on arms protruding from the central pole. Cables are internal to the pole. The central bus architecture of the pole is discussed.

Consider a long metal pole extending from floor to ceiling. Attached to the pole at user-determined intervals are platforms upon which computer equipment sits. The platforms can pivot 360 degrees. The central pole forms the central axis around which platforms are attached. For example, a PC display can sit on one platform, a printer on another, the disks on another, a light on another, etc. The closest prior-art ideas are pole lamps and plant stands which consist of a pole to which are attached hangers for plants. Some advantages are as follows:

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1) Power and communication lines are tucked inside the central pole, and are out of the way. 2) The need for large bulky stands is reduced. 3) Equipment can easily pivot. The pole can be placed near a desk or function without a nearby desk. 4) The central pole can provide other functions such as a common ground, shielding, a common on/off switch, etc., and a ground fault interrupter. 5) It is easy to market; it has a "high tech look". 6) It is sturdy and will not topple over. Each platform is securely attached, yet moveable. 7) This stand allows each user to adjust all the pertinent heights for their own individual needs. 8) This stand eliminates the need for tables.

Fig. 1 shows a pole unit with various computer peripheral devices mounted on the arms. The unit is composed of a heavy duty metal pole 1 which is firmly held in place by a pole holder 2 permanently mounted to the floor or ceiling. Alternatively, the pole can have a large metal plate, several feet in diameter, sitting on the floor. Note that the top and bottom pole holder are preferable, but we do not require that the top pole holder be mounted to the building frame for strength since the computer peripherals give high torsional loads about the pole axis. To clarify, if a top mounting is not easily installed in an office, the pole is very firmly mounted to a large radius platform which sits on the floor. The platform must be large enough to extend past the center of gravity of the entire unit. The large platform transfers the torsional load from the unit to the floor.

The pole has a series of evenly spaced slots 3 for the common wiring bus which serves the pole unit. All devices plug into the slot nearest its position. All cabling for the computer peripherals run inside of the arms. Special cables are provided which allow the standard plugs and connectors to be attached at one end and the connectors for the common bus attached at the other. Thus, the standard plugs and connectors are neatly tucked into cavities in the arms 4. The arms are composed of an inner arm 4 and an outer arm 5. The inner arm is mounted on the pole wit...