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Browse Prior Art Database

Programmable Liquid Crystal Display Mouse Pads

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000035948D
Original Publication Date: 1989-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Jan-28
Document File: 2 page(s) / 131K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

McLean, JG: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

A technique is described whereby versatile liquid crystal display (LCD) mouse pads provide a variety of optical pad patterns, as used in personal computer applications. The concept provides the user the ability to rapidly reconfigure graphic patterns without the need to adjust computer software.

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Programmable Liquid Crystal Display Mouse Pads

A technique is described whereby versatile liquid crystal display (LCD) mouse pads provide a variety of optical pad patterns, as used in personal computer applications. The concept provides the user the ability to rapidly reconfigure graphic patterns without the need to adjust computer software.

Optical puck and mouse instruments are commonly available for personal computer applications, in which the operational pads are designed with a special reflective surface. The reflective surface will typically have an embedded grid pattern to enable the mouse mechanism to count steps, as required. The concept described herein is an

(Image Omitted)

extension to the embedded grid pattern, whereby the grid pad is supplied as an LCD pattern, such that a programmable mouse pad can be instantly configurable to any number of different "types" of patterns.

The LCD pad, as shown in Fig. 1, consists of an LCD screen embedded in a tablet. Grid patterns, as shown in Fig. 2, are available to the user whereby a choice of even spacing, additive, multiplicative and/or logarithmically spaced patterns can be interchanged on the tablet. The mouse function is accomplished with a normal optical puck type of mouse, or with a light pen, for the graphical data input device to the personal computer. The mouse reads the illuminated LCD lines. Mirrored back-light is employed to provide the required contrast.

The grid configuration for the LCD screen pad is controlled by any means used for writing data to the LCDs. For example, a 256K x 1 memory chip would be located inside of the tablet and would have the ability to store numerous grid patterns. Each screen pattern would be...