Browse Prior Art Database

Mosaic Display Mullion Correction

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000035978D
Original Publication Date: 1989-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Jan-28
Document File: 2 page(s) / 34K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Kesling, DP: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Disclosed is a method that allows a liquid crystal display (LCD) mosaic to project a complete image to the display area. The mullion problem is reduced or eliminated with the use of directional reflectors along the outer rows and columns.

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Mosaic Display Mullion Correction

Disclosed is a method that allows a liquid crystal display (LCD) mosaic to project a complete image to the display area. The mullion problem is reduced or eliminated with the use of directional reflectors along the outer rows and columns.

A typical embodiment for a mosaic display is a screen composed of a matrix of separate LCDs (tiles). The tiles have a connecting bus with each distinct tile having a unique address. The tiles are attached with a thin bendable adhesive material so that they can be positioned at angles with respect to one another.

The tiles are typically rectangular. However, other geometries are also made available, such as hexagonal, which are assembled into a complete screen. Three-dimensional polyhedral screens, such as icosahedra, are available using these unique geometries.

The mullion effect is reduced by using reflectors along the outer edges of each tile. Fig. 1 shows a small portion of the back of a typical display. The upper right corner 1 is shown. The front of the display 2, not seen in this drawing, has uniformly-sized pixels. The back side of the display 3 has narrower pixels around the top and right edges. This allows the entire front of the display to present visual data without requiring the tiles to reach the outer edges.

The four columns of tiles on the right edge 4 are approximately half the width of the tiles in the center of the display. The four rows of tiles on the upper edge 5 are approxi...