Browse Prior Art Database

Nanostructures With Optical Lithography and Double Silylation

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000036016D
Original Publication Date: 1989-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Jan-28
Document File: 2 page(s) / 31K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Brady, MJ: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

At the present time there is a lot of interest in the fabrication of structures with sub-micron dimensions generated by increasing demands for higher density and switching speeds. This in turn has stimulated studies of the electrical and physical properties of ultrasmall structures. The structures of interest usually require multiply connected lines with dimensions in the sub-micron range of 50 to 200 nm, and require electron or X-ray lithography, since these dimensions are beyond the resolution of conventional optical lithography. This requires many steps and is a cost-intensive technique.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 63% of the total text.

Page 1 of 2

Nanostructures With Optical Lithography and Double Silylation

At the present time there is a lot of interest in the fabrication of structures with sub-micron dimensions generated by increasing demands for higher density and switching speeds. This in turn has stimulated studies of the electrical and physical properties of ultrasmall structures. The structures of interest usually require multiply connected lines with dimensions in the sub-micron range of 50 to 200 nm, and require electron or X-ray lithography, since these dimensions are beyond the resolution of conventional optical lithography. This requires many steps and is a cost-intensive technique.

A fabrication technique is described that uses conventional photolithography and standard semiconductor processing to achieve novel fine-line structures with dimensions on the order of 100 nm. This is achieved by the use of a positive photoresist, which consists of a novalac resin and a photoactive diazo compound, and allows for the diffusion of silicon into the resist (silylation). The silylated resist provides oxygen resistence during plasma etching, thus allowing patterning of the resist where silylation has occurred. This resist stencil can then be used as a mask for dry etching of an underlying layer of a conductor or insulator in a reactive plasma.

An AZ-type resist such as AZ 4000 series (American Hoechst Corp.) is spun on, for example, on a blanket-coated metallized substrate using conventional optical photo...