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Composite Structures and Fabrication Processes for Flexible, High Temperature Superconductors

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000036024D
Original Publication Date: 1989-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Jan-28
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Cuomo, JJ: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

High temperature superconductors can be made ductile by making a composite of the superconductor and a ductile material. The composite material is deposited by simultaneously plasma spray depositing a high temperature superconductor and a ductile material. The resulting material is a microscopically uniform mixture that preserves the high Tc characteristics.

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Composite Structures and Fabrication Processes for Flexible, High Temperature Superconductors

High temperature superconductors can be made ductile by making a composite of the superconductor and a ductile material. The composite material is deposited by simultaneously plasma spray depositing a high temperature superconductor and a ductile material. The resulting material is a microscopically uniform mixture that preserves the high Tc characteristics.

Composite films of high temperature superconducting materials such as YBa2Cu3Ox and a ductile material such as copper are deposited by plasma spraying such that uniform mixing occurs at the growth surface and incorporated into the growing structure, producing a uniform composite. A powder (or wire) of Cu and, separately, a powder of YBa2Cu3Ox are fed into the plasma source. The material condenses onto the substrate surface and rapidly solidifies (typically 105 K/sec), thus preventing significant interdiffusion and also producing good adhesion of the film to the substrate.

Composites of Cu and YBa2Cu3Ox with compositions of 2, 5, 10, 30 and 50% Cu were prepared. With standard annealing, the films were found to be flexible and showed the high temperature transitions of about 90 K. Cross- sections of the films were examined optically and uniformly dispersed copper rich regions were observed. Other ductile materials (even polymers) may be used in place of copper.

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