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Remotely Activated Graphic Equalizer

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000036038D
Original Publication Date: 1989-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Jan-28
Document File: 5 page(s) / 83K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Fisher, JO: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

A technique is described whereby a remotely activated graphic equalizer provides the ability to change equalizer frequencies in sound systems. The device, using standard infrared (IR) detector technology, provides hand-held graphic interface capabilities to enable a listener to remotely adjust equalizer frequencies some distance away from a receiver. Described is the use of the device in stereo sound systems and for applications requiring phone-controlled frequency equalization.

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Remotely Activated Graphic Equalizer

A technique is described whereby a remotely activated graphic equalizer provides the ability to change equalizer frequencies in sound systems. The device, using standard infrared (IR) detector technology, provides hand-held graphic interface capabilities to enable a listener to remotely adjust equalizer frequencies some distance away from a receiver. Described is the use of the device in stereo sound systems and for applications requiring phone-controlled frequency equalization.

Typically, multi-band frequency equalizers require that adjustments of the multi-band frequencies be performed at the receiver itself, unless wires, cables and auxiliary equipment are used. However, to fully appreciate the effects of equalization, the listener must often be positioned some distance from the receiver's adjustments.

The concept described herein provides a means of adjusting equalization from a remote location without the need of cables, so that the listener can hear the equalized audio at a proper monitoring location.

(Image Omitted)

The hand-held remote device enables the listener to move about a room while adjusting the various frequencies.

The device consists of liquid crystal display (LCD) screen 10, as shown in Fig. 1, finger-setting touch ribbon 11, finger band selector touch ribbon 12, control buttons 13, function buttons 14, battery compartment 15, IR transmitter 16 and right/left microphones 17.

LCD screen 10 is used to display the band setting as the adjustment takes place at finger-actuated control touch ribbons 11 and 12. Touch ribbon 11 adjusts the volume level of a frequency range selected via touch ribbon 12. This volume level change can be observed on LCD screen 10.

The listener slides a finger along touch ribbon 12, or presses a particular area, to select one of eight adjustment ranges. Both touch ribbons 11 and 12 are composed of a series of conductive/nonconductive strips. They enable current to pass through the finger to an adjacent

(Image Omitted)

strip, thereby indicating the desired level or range. The device is unique in that it provides graphic feedback, whereby a listener altering the volume level of any frequency range can observe the change on LCD screen 10.

Control buttons 13 consist of four circuit buttons and are used to provide the desired controls: a) VOLUME button allows the listener to adjust the overall volume of all frequencies; b) SET button sends the requested range levels to equalize at the stereo unit via IR transmitter 16; c) AUTO button allows the unit to

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constantly change the stereo unit; and d) ON/OFF button controls the power of the base unit.

Function buttons 14 consist of four buttons and are used for preset levels. A function button is pressed at the same time as the set button so as to record the information on LCD screen 10. When the listener desires to return to the recorded equalizer output, a corresponding function button is depressed. Fu...