Browse Prior Art Database

Heat Sink With Small-Scale Etched Pin Fins

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000036063D
Original Publication Date: 1989-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Jan-28
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Carbone, MC: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Disclosed is a process for economical fabrication of a heat sink with a dense array of small-scale pin fins. Decreasing the size and increasing the number of fins affords an advantage in the ultimate cooling density achievable. Such heat sinks will elicit high heat transfer rates when an impinging fluid flow is directed along the axis of the pins.

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Heat Sink With Small-Scale Etched Pin Fins

Disclosed is a process for economical fabrication of a heat sink with a dense array of small-scale pin fins. Decreasing the size and increasing the number of fins affords an advantage in the ultimate cooling density achievable. Such heat sinks will elicit high heat transfer rates when an impinging fluid flow is directed along the axis of the pins.

Fabrication starts with a bundle of wires made of a thermally conductive material such as copper. The wire diameter is chosen with the desired fin diameter in mind; very small diameter fins are possible. This bundle is then cast or extruded into a matrix metal which encases the bundle and fills the voids between individual wires. The matrix material must have a lower melting point, an equal or higher coefficient of thermal expansion, and different chemical etch characteristics than the wire material.

The resulting casting is cut into disks perpendicular to its axis. One side of the disk is polished to a find finish for good interface heat transfer. The opposite side of the disk is exposed to a chemical which etches the wire material at a slower (or even zero) rate relative to the matrix material, thus exposing the wire ends as pin fins. The etch process can be tailored to produce the desired pin spacing and pin cross-sectional geometry.

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