Browse Prior Art Database

Visual Identification Tool

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000036111D
Original Publication Date: 1989-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Jan-28
Document File: 3 page(s) / 66K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Kelly, HL: AUTHOR

Abstract

As part of the semiconductor manufacturing process, a chip placement tool is utilized to place semiconductor chips onto ceramic substrates at the correct locations for a given product type. Different products utilize different quantities of chips and locations on the substrate for these devices, and also many different types of devices. The different semiconductor chips can be identified by a "part number", and their origin at dicing can be determined via their "lot number". The devices are transported, stored and delivered to the chip placement tool in linear device banks (LDBs), as shown in Fig. 1. The grid of the LDB may be 4 by 30, as shown in Fig. 1, or 3 by 24, or 2 by 15 for larger size semiconductor chips. Ideally, the outer physical dimensions of the LDB are kept constant.

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Visual Identification Tool

As part of the semiconductor manufacturing process, a chip placement tool is utilized to place semiconductor chips onto ceramic substrates at the correct locations for a given product type. Different products utilize different quantities of chips and locations on the substrate for these devices, and also many different types of devices. The different semiconductor chips can be identified by a "part number", and their origin at dicing can be determined via their "lot number". The devices are transported, stored and delivered to the chip placement tool in linear device banks (LDBs), as shown in Fig. 1. The grid of the LDB may be 4 by 30, as shown in Fig. 1, or 3 by 24, or 2 by 15 for larger size semiconductor chips. Ideally, the outer physical dimensions of the LDB are kept constant. A printed label is attached to the LDB at dicing to relay the unique lot number and part number for the devices inside. Once the LDBs' chips are all removed and placed on the substrate, this label is removed and the LDB is sent back to dicing for reuse. Each LDB also has its own unique serial number, identified and machine readable via a permanently affixed bar code.

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At the chip placement tool, one or more LDB of each chip part number needed for placement onto the ceramic substrate are loaded onto an input table where the LDB bar codes may be automatically read. In a typical chip placement operation, more than 20 different part numbers may be involved, with many more potential lot numbers. The chip placement tool has a bar code reader to read the serial numbers of the LDBs loaded into it for use, but it must access a host computer system to know what part number and lot number is in each LDB. The part numbers are necessary to place the devices correctly, and the lot numbers must be known to allow product traceability. A map of which grid cavities contain or do not contain devices are relayed to the chip placement tool by the host, so that it knows where to go for chips in each LDB. The problem lies in how to inform the host of the part number, lot number, and chip map for each of the hundreds of LDBs that must be handled each day. Manual entry of all of this data would be extremely time consuming, tedious, and prone to error.

Prior art tools suffer from at least two dr...