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Full Hebrew VOCALIZATION Support for Enhanced Graphics Adapter-Driven Displays

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000036198D
Original Publication Date: 1989-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Jan-28
Document File: 9 page(s) / 266K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Storisteanu, A: AUTHOR

Abstract

In Hebrew, words written without vowel modifiers can introduce ambiguity, and correct interpretation of a word can thus become context sensitive. Fully vocalized text, however, is mainly restricted for use in children's literature, poetry, religious writings, etc.

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Full Hebrew VOCALIZATION Support for Enhanced Graphics Adapter- Driven Displays

In Hebrew, words written without vowel modifiers can introduce ambiguity, and correct interpretation of a word can thus become context sensitive. Fully vocalized text, however, is mainly restricted for use in children's literature, poetry, religious writings, etc.

While most current printed material uses some form of partial vocalization, requirements for full vocalization in such areas, for example, as speech synthesis, are very stringent.

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In the present method of producing fully-vocalized Hebrew text, the vowel modifiers have been segmented into three sets (See Fig. 8) according to their respective physical relationships to the modified consonant. These three sets segment the vowels by three vertical levels, and include those combinations which can occur within one level. These normally correspond to the three physical layers which make up a display line in the present technique: a basic central line (Lc), extended by two layers (La and Lb) positioned above and below it for vowel modifiers and character extension.

Note, however, that for the final shape of letter caf, Vb vowels are regularly positioned in the central layer Lc of the display line.

Code point vectors are defined for each group, which are accessed in a systematic manner via the code of the character and the combination of vowel modifiers attached for building the final display character.

DISPLAY INTERFACE VOCALIZATION EXTENSION: The display interface extension which handles the vocalization support is schematically depicted in Fig. 1. Its main components are: three display character sets;

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- a data structure consisting of character descriptors, vowel/ character vectors, and accessing data; routines to build a character, handle vocalization mode switch, maintain display window and cursor information.

The display interface extension is virtually transparent to the application program. The application views a logical display line as consisting of one single physical display line (i.e., one row on the display).

DISPLAY CHARACTER SETS: There are three character fonts defined for this method, which are downloaded to the enhanced graphics adapter (EGA) according to the active vocalization mode: vocalization disabled V00, vocalization enabled V10, or vocalization active V11. F0 - mode V00.

This is a regular Hebrew code page display font (8 x 14 pels - 25 display rows), such as that shown in Fig. 2.

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F1 and F2 - modes V10, V11.

F1 is downloaded as the primary font, F2 as the secondary. These two fonts complement each other in assembling fully-formed Hebrew script characters. In modes V10 and V11, each character on the display is made up of three physical characters (Lc, La, and Lb), from font F1, font F2, or a combination of these. The character box is 8 x 8 pels (43 display rows, 14 logical text lines). The pel patterns for these fonts...