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Multipass Printing Using Reflow Ribbon

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000036250D
Original Publication Date: 1989-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Jan-28
Document File: 3 page(s) / 74K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Campbell, AS: AUTHOR

Abstract

Resistive Ribbon Thermal Transfer printing can be configured to print on the same ribbon several times if the ink is redistributed on the ribbon after each print pass. This process of redistribution on the ribbon is known as ink reflow. It involves melting the ink by contacting a hot surface so the ink which remains on the ribbon after printing can be spread out over the ribbon so as to fill in the areas from which ink was removed by printing.

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Multipass Printing Using Reflow Ribbon

Resistive Ribbon Thermal Transfer printing can be configured to print on the same ribbon several times if the ink is redistributed on the ribbon after each print pass. This process of redistribution on the ribbon is known as ink reflow. It involves melting the ink by contacting a hot surface so the ink which remains on the ribbon after printing can be spread out over the ribbon so as to fill in the areas from which ink was removed by printing.

The number of times that a ribbon can be reused is limited by the extent of ribbon damage during printing and the amount of ink left on the ribbon after printing. The extent of damage to the ribbon during printing is a function of the number of electrodes on at a time and the length of time that they stay on. When many electrodes are on for a

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long time, ribbon damage is increased due to head heating. If large amounts of ink are removed from a length of ribbon, as in printing dense graphics, it is difficult to get adequate ink distribution along the length of ribbon in order to fill in the used areas. The following invention seeks to solve these problems.

This invention describes a multipass print scheme in which a checkerboard mask is used to print one third of the line at a time with no more than one third of the electrodes on at a time. This mask is shown in Figs. 1a-1d. The worst-case printing situation is printing a solid black area. Fig. 1a shows the effect of the mask on the first print pass. After printing this line, the carrier is returned without an index and the second pass of printing is done. The cumulative result of the first and second passes is shown in Fig. 1b. Again the carrier is returned without indexing and the third pass printing is done resulting in a solid black area, as shown in Fig. 1c. The paper is indexed during the n...