Browse Prior Art Database

Mouth-Interpreter Via Optical Fibers and Infrared Link

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000036263D
Original Publication Date: 1989-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Jan-28
Document File: 3 page(s) / 59K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Kugel, LE: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

This article describes a method of translating mouth and lip movements into electrical signals. A device incorporates fiber-optic flexible connectors to translate mouth and lip movements into signals which are fed through an infrared (IR) link to a using device. This serves as an aid in speech recognition.

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Mouth-Interpreter Via Optical Fibers and Infrared Link

This article describes a method of translating mouth and lip movements into electrical signals. A device incorporates fiber-optic flexible connectors to translate mouth and lip movements into signals which are fed through an infrared (IR) link to a using device. This serves as an aid in speech recognition.

In noisy environments and in situations where audible sound translation is not practical, a means is needed to allow recognition of mouth and lip movements for speech recognition. This can be used instead of or as a supplement to normal keyboard entry to a using device.

Fig. 1 shows a user 1 who is communicating with a using device 2. Typically, this is a personal computer with a monitor for feedback to the user. Additionally, this speech recognition method can be used with any equipment that the user needs to control. A mouthpiece 3 is placed in the user's mouth. The IR signals are sent to an IR receiver 4 on the using device. The signals from the IR receiver are interpreted by the using device to control the equipment as programmed.

(Image Omitted)

Fig. 2 shows a graphical pictorial of the mouthpiece. It is composed of a thin, flexible plastic material which encapsulates the working elements of the device. The mouthpiece saddles around both the upper and lower lips, on both the inside and outside of the mouth. The dashed line 5 indicates the edge that is inside of the user's mouth. The solid line indicates the edge that is outside of the user's mouth. The material is originally formed to have a tendency to maintain a circular hollow torus shape, approximating the shape of a fully opened mouth. This tendency, along with the stickiness of the material, keeps the mouthpiece tight against the lips during use. The formed mouthpiece can be envisioned as a hollow torus with the outer circumference removed.

The series of six flexible fiber connectors 7 are encapsulated in the plastic material inside of the mouth. They are positioned at the right, center and left of both the upper and lower inside lips. These six flexible fiber connectors detect motion at each of these positions and transfer the angular information to the control circuitry 8 which is located below the inside lower lip. The information is then sent to the IR transmitters located at the outside right 9 and outside left 10 of the mouth piece.

A battery 11 is encapsulated below the inside lower lip and supplies power for the unit. Five to ten milliamps at two to three volts are required to run the device. This current is only required when the mouth and lips are in motion and sending data to the using device. The information is sampled approximately 50 times per second. With this approach, a standard watch AA cell battery will run the device

(Image Omitted)

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for several hundred hours o...