Browse Prior Art Database

Flow-Through Cell for Chemical Process Control

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000036316D
Original Publication Date: 1989-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Jan-28
Document File: 2 page(s) / 57K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Bindra, P: AUTHOR [+6]

Abstract

Real-time chemical process monitoring and control requires continuous sensing of solution conditions. Commercially available flow-through cells require high solution volumes/flow rates. They are susceptible to chemical attack; they impede solution flow (limiting the number of cells which can operate in series); they result in solution stagnation in corners and crevices; they leak; and their probes are difficult to change and observe without removal from the cell. Finally, they are difficult and expensive to manufacture. (Image Omitted)

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Flow-Through Cell for Chemical Process Control

Real-time chemical process monitoring and control requires continuous sensing of solution conditions. Commercially available flow-through cells require high solution volumes/flow rates. They are susceptible to chemical attack; they impede solution flow (limiting the number of cells which can operate in series); they result in solution stagnation in corners and crevices; they leak; and their probes are difficult to change and observe without removal from the cell. Finally, they are difficult and expensive to manufacture.

(Image Omitted)

This article describes an improved design for a flow-through cell suitable for on-line industrial applications. Cell components are fabricated from a variety of materials to allow correct matching for solution compatibility. The oval flow chamber design eliminates corners and surfaces perpendicular to solution flow, thereby minimizing solution stagnation, drag and backflow and allowing high flow rates.

The probes are easily removable and replaceable in situ, due to the use of a thumbscrew bushing. Moreover, the O-ring is forced inward to seal against the probe and seat against the cell due to uniform vertical pressure exerted from the bushing. The probe can be continuously observed during operation. This feature is facilitated by a double-sealed glass-viewing port.

The cell design is clarified in the attached drawings. Figs. 1, 2 and 3 depict a cell designed specifically for colorimetr...