Browse Prior Art Database

Connector for Input/Output From Board Tails

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000036347D
Original Publication Date: 1989-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Jan-28
Document File: 2 page(s) / 81K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Macek, JS: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

A concept has been configured which provides higher input/output (I/O) density from a computer module site. This increase in density is accomplished by extending each module pin contact tail to the rear side of the board and subsequently making contact to these extensions. It is the intent of this publication to delineate two specific means of making contact to these extended tails. (Image Omitted)

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 54% of the total text.

Page 1 of 2

Connector for Input/Output From Board Tails

A concept has been configured which provides higher input/output (I/O) density from a computer module site. This increase in density is accomplished by extending each module pin contact tail to the rear side of the board and subsequently making contact to these extensions. It is the intent of this publication to delineate two specific means of making contact to these extended tails.

(Image Omitted)

Each of these concepts makes use of a circuit card to provide flat cable interfacing to the aforementioned extended module contact tails. In the first configuration, this card is electrically attached permanently to these tails. In the second configuration, this card is used as a detachable member which has a permanent electrical bond to the flat cable and is inserted between these extended contact tails.

The former configuration is illustrated in Fig. 1. Referring to this figure, a paddle card 1 is permanently attached to the contact tails which extend from the board. This card is so configured that it has conductors which are opposed and common on either side so that a dual contact can mate with each side forming redundant contact points. The contact 2 used in this specific connector is shown as the classical "tuning fork" contact and is held in the correct relationship to the correct lands (pads) of the paddle card by a dielectric molding 3. Obviously, any other contact having opposed contact points would serve equally well in this application. The dielectric molding need only to have the necessary mechanical strength and stabilit...