Browse Prior Art Database

On-Card Protocol Analysis Mechanism

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000036483D
Original Publication Date: 1989-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Jan-29
Document File: 3 page(s) / 37K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Millas, RJ: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

This article describes a mechanism which performs protocol analysis functions within a communications attachment card in a data communications system and is controllable from a remote location via the card's service part. (Image Omitted)

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
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On-Card Protocol Analysis Mechanism

This article describes a mechanism which performs protocol analysis functions within a communications attachment card in a data communications system and is controllable from a remote location via the card's service part.

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Debugging a data communications system is a complex task that requires sophisticated specialized equipment, such as a protocol analyzer. Protocol analyzers are bulky and must be used by skilled personnel.

When a problem develops in the field, and a product engineer is called for assistance, the engineer usually requires the use of a protocol analyzer. The analyzer is either brought with the engineer or is leased from a local equipment rental company.

A mechanism is disclosed herein which performs protocol analysis functions within a communications attachment card, and is controllable from a remote location via the card's service port. This mechanism is built into the communications attachment card. Today's dense technology can allow the inclusion of additional product engineering functions such as this, with little or no additional hardware modules. By including a built-in protocol analysis mechanism, the product engineer may not have to travel to the customer site. Debugging the

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problem may be done remotely. This mechanism can be fully implemented in hardware. A full implementation in hardware will allow the monitoring of data without altering the timing of the controller card. Therefore, critical timing problems can be monitored with ease.

Fig. 1 shows a data communications card attached to a host. Fig. 2 shows the physical connection of the on-card protocol analyzer. The protocol analysis mechanism is located between the line drivers/ receivers and the universal synchronous asynchronous receiver/ transmitter (USARTs). This mechanism monitors both transmit and receive data on a full duplex line. This data is then sent out through the service port along with control information at three times the baud rate of the line being monitored. This speed is used to provide real- time monitoring of transmit data, receive data and control information.

A modem is attached to the service port to allow the information to be sent to a remote location. A personal computer at the remote station is used for analyzing and displaying the data. Commands issued from the remote statio...