Browse Prior Art Database

System for Controlling Connector Activation With Feedback

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000036504D
Original Publication Date: 1989-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Jan-29
Document File: 2 page(s) / 47K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Curtis, SA: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

The proliferation of personal computers has brought with it an increased demand for simplifying their use. One key area of simplification has been the setup or configuration, especially the installation of option cards. Disclosed is a set of circuits that allow for easy installation of option cards in electronic systems, in this example, a personal computer.

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System for Controlling Connector Activation With Feedback

The proliferation of personal computers has brought with it an increased demand for simplifying their use. One key area of simplification has been the setup or configuration, especially the installation of option cards. Disclosed is a set of circuits that allow for easy installation of option cards in electronic systems, in this example, a personal computer.

The circuitry at the personal computer's feature slots consists of a shape memory alloy connector, a timer, a button, and some power transistors. When the button is pushed, the timer activates the heater lines in the connector, causing it to open. While the connector is open, the user inserts an option card into the connector. When the timer stops, the connector cools and closes. The power to the option card is blocked by the power transistors until the option card transmits its code to the system, biasing the transistors.

The circuitry on the option card transmits the signal to enable power. The circuit is battery operated, and also contains a button. When the button is pushed, the circuitry is energized for a period of time during which it transmits its code to the electronic system for verification. A block diagram of the circuit is shown in Fig. 1.

(Image Omitted)

The last part of the invention is the personal computer's receiver/decoder circuit. A block diagram is shown in Fig. 2. When the phototransistor receives the pulses and the Schmitt trigge...