Browse Prior Art Database

Transducer Platen Flight Time Routine

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000036514D
Original Publication Date: 1989-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Jan-29
Document File: 3 page(s) / 82K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Anderson, LL: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

Disclosed is an efficient algorithm and operator routine for flight timing the hammer unit of an impact printer using a transducer platen. In addition, printer settings for multi-part forms and print energy may be verified.

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Transducer Platen Flight Time Routine

Disclosed is an efficient algorithm and operator routine for flight timing the hammer unit of an impact printer using a transducer platen. In addition, printer settings for multi-part forms and print energy may be verified.

Significant improvements in the flight timing of print hammers have been made in recent time. Mechanical adjustment has given way to easier electrical adjustment, and operator installed flight time bars are being replaced by in-situ transducer platens. A transducer platen is a platen with a piezo-electric element embedded in the platen assembly. This element gives off an electrical signal when the platen is impacted by a hammer. The magnitude of the signal is proportional to the magnitude of the impact. It is desired to use the transducer platen in an efficient manner.

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For ease of use and accuracy it is desirable to measure flight time with the print forms and ribbon in place in the printer and the printer functioning (i.e., print band moving, covers closed, etc.). The print band is moved in order to flight time to a consistent character type. Characters such as M or H may be used since they tend to receive average usage (and therefore average wear). The ribbon is incremented to avoid any damage by the repeated impacts of the flight time routine.

Experimental testing has shown that the forms do not have to be incremented through the flight time routine. Therefore, the flight time procedure only requires one line of printing, and over printing on this is the preferred mode of operation. Statistical and experimental analyses have shown that less than 10 impacts are sufficient to characterize the flight time of a particular hammer within acceptable error limits. Flight timing may also be performed without any forms in place, i.e., just the ribbon.

The operator routine i...