Browse Prior Art Database

Planarizing Metal Insulator Structures

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000036601D
Original Publication Date: 1989-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Jan-29
Document File: 2 page(s) / 44K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Hafner, B: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Structures consisting of a substrate, a conductive pattern formed thereon and an insulator material blanket deposited on top are planarized by exposing them through the mask used to form the pattern. As a result, the insulator material on top of the conductive material becomes preferably removable.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 87% of the total text.

Page 1 of 2

Planarizing Metal Insulator Structures

Structures consisting of a substrate, a conductive pattern formed thereon and an insulator material blanket deposited on top are planarized by exposing them through the mask used to form the pattern. As a result, the insulator material on top of the conductive material becomes preferably removable.

In a first embodiment (Figs. 1 to 3), a substrate 1 with a conductive pattern 2 and a cover 3 of polymide is provided with a positive photoresist layer 4 by spinning (Fig. 1). The photoresist is exposed through mask 5, previously used to define the conductive pattern, and through mask 6 defining a viahole, with the total light intensity employed being sufficient to thoroughly expose the photoresist. Then, the photoresist is developed (Fig. 2) and reflowed. In an RIE step, photoresist 4 and, in areas where there is no or only a thin photoresist layer, at least part of the polyimide 3 are removed (Fig. 3).

In a second embodiment (Figs. 4 to 6), a substrate 1 with a conductive pattern 2 and a cover 7 of a photosensitive polyimide is provided with a positive photoresist layer 4 by spinning (Fig. 4). The photoresist is exposed through mask 8, previously used to define the conductive pattern, and developed (Fig. 5). The exposed polyimide

(Image Omitted)

areas are cured by blanket exposure, using UV light to which the photoresist is not transparent. By optionally simultaneously removing the photoresist and the uncured polyimide only, the...