Browse Prior Art Database

Automatic Macro/Module Generation

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000036678D
Original Publication Date: 1989-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Jan-29
Document File: 3 page(s) / 37K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Boyd, KW: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

This invention relates to a method for automatically generating multiple levels of documentation and interface macros from original documentation. Providing this control at the documentation level enhances the coordination of documentation and macro interface changes.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 59% of the total text.

Page 1 of 3

Automatic Macro/Module Generation

This invention relates to a method for automatically generating multiple levels of documentation and interface macros from original documentation. Providing this control at the documentation level enhances the coordination of documentation and macro interface changes.

Control is provided by means of a set of General Markup Language (GML) tags and a related context-sensitive editor, running as an ISPF dialog. In operation, a programmer invokes the editor from an initial selection screen, and is presented with a number of choices (for example, supplying general macro information, supplying a functional description, supplying information on invocation of the function, supplying information on macro parameters, etc.). Depending on the function selected, an entry panel is displayed with the appropriate GML tag and "fill in blank" parameters. The programmer proceeds to enter the information that pertains to the interface he is defining.

After the interface has been defined by describing the macro(s), the description thus created is kept in a library from which information is extracted to create documentation of varying format and level of detail, as well as to create macros themselves.

(Image Omitted)

This interaction is described in Fig. 1 (the cross-hatched areas indicate where elements of this invention are brought into play).

As an example, a programmer wishing to define a new macro would select a series of ISPF screens which would prompt him for: General Macro Information

Functional Description

Invocation Requirements

Macro Form

Keys, Keywords, and Values

Invocation Information

(Image Omitted)

In supplying "general macro information", he would "fill in the blanks" in a screen containing information of this type: :macdoc

macname ---- Macro nam...