Browse Prior Art Database

Air Cushion Locator Nest

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000036714D
Original Publication Date: 1989-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Jan-29
Document File: 2 page(s) / 41K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Joerg, JD: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

A means is disclosed for picking, transferring and accurately locating a discrete electronic part in x, y, and theta dimensions for subsequent placement in a processing fixture. An essential element of the system, an air cushion locator nest (ACLN), is described that is capable of safely protecting such parts during transfer, with minimal exposure to product or tooling damage.

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Air Cushion Locator Nest

A means is disclosed for picking, transferring and accurately locating a discrete electronic part in x, y, and theta dimensions for subsequent placement in a processing fixture. An essential element of the system, an air cushion locator nest (ACLN), is described that is capable of safely protecting such parts during transfer, with minimal exposure to product or tooling damage.

Minute chip components, e.g., decoupling capacitors, must be transferred to fixtures for further processing. Existing component transfer operations are carried out on a pick-and-place tool, requiring a realignment of the enroute part, thereby adding to handling losses such as chipping, internal fracturing, etc., of the part. These losses can be eliminated by use of the ACLN, which employs a vacuum- pencil cavity pick-up, with integral air-jets bearing on all four sides of the component, as illustrated in Fig. 1. The part is allowed to center itself by fluidic effects during transfer to its destination, thus eliminating the need for an orienting station stop now required during transfer.

Referring to Fig. 1, the ACLN 1 uses perpendicularly directed force(s) 2 against the perimeter of the component chip 3, enabling the component chip to centrally locate itself in the pocket 4. The upper

(Image Omitted)

and lower sections of Fig. 2 show that balancing forces are achieved on the component perimeter by passing controlled, pressurized air through eight orifices 5, two per wall. The AC...