Browse Prior Art Database

High-Availability Server

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000036736D
Original Publication Date: 1989-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Jan-29
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Friedl, PJ: AUTHOR

Abstract

This invention relates to a method for managing access to a server having a single-access port among requesting workstations. Each workstation has information processing capability, and is equipped with buffer memory in which to accumulate and store individual requests, orders, and commands initiated by the person using the workstation. A communications circuit is then made between the workstation and the server (which occupies the single port of access to the server for the entire period of the server's response to the incoming batch command stream from the workstation).

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High-Availability Server

This invention relates to a method for managing access to a server having a single-access port among requesting workstations. Each workstation has information processing capability, and is equipped with buffer memory in which to accumulate and store individual requests, orders, and commands initiated by the person using the workstation. A communications circuit is then made between the workstation and the server (which occupies the single port of access to the server for the entire period of the server's response to the incoming batch command stream from the workstation). These buffered commands are transmitted to the server in a batch mode, and the server processes each command, transmits resulting information back to the workstation, and breaks the connection to the workstation immediately after all commands have been processed.

The high-availability server method described herein results in connection times which are an order of magnitude lower than those which result from interactive or time-shared methods where users at workstations spend significant amounts of "think time" as part of the workstation-server connection period. As a result of these low connection times, a high-availability server is able to serve an order of magnitude more workstations than servers based upon interactive, time- shared methods.

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