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Interactive Computer Narrative and Illustration Program

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000036903D
Original Publication Date: 1989-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Jan-29
Document File: 2 page(s) / 14K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Chess, DM: AUTHOR

Abstract

A technique is described whereby an interactive computer narrative and illustration program provides assistance to prospective travelers and promoters of travel. Text is used for interactive customer instruction, along with graphic illustration and secondary displays, if available.

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Interactive Computer Narrative and Illustration Program

A technique is described whereby an interactive computer narrative and illustration program provides assistance to prospective travelers and promoters of travel. Text is used for interactive customer instruction, along with graphic illustration and secondary displays, if available.

Generally, place-based institutions, such as parks, museums, chambers of commerce, etc., wishing to advertise their existence to potential customers are restricted to traditional static media, such as printed brochures or non-interactive motion media, such as television commercials. Used to a limited extent are video travelogues. Fuller interactive capabilities have been used almost exclusively in the limited field of narrative games and puzzles. The concept described herein expands on the interactive capabilities of prior art by providing computer programming that allows the user to interact, through natural-language commands, with a computer simulation of the appropriate part of the real world. This would be described to the user through written narratives and presented visually through computer-graphic illustration.

The software accomplishes the following four major objectives:

1. Present potential customers with increasingly

vivid and accurate information about institutions

and attractions,

2. Present the information, from step 1, in a way

that facilitates "active" learning for the

customers so that they will feel at home even on

their first visit to a travel location.

3. Allow proprietors to publicize institutions and

attractions in a way likely to be more attractive

and "involving" than the traditional media.

4. Utilize personal computers in a new and popular

way.

The important aspects of the concept is that the user interacts with the system, enabling the sort of active learning which is generally much stronger than passive seeing or hearing. The system involves the prospective customer more than passive media, while allowing the user to use existing devices, such as the personal computer.

A typical implementation of such a program might be as follows:

1. First, present...