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Method for Making Circuits on Circuit Boards

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000036932D
Original Publication Date: 1989-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Jan-29
Document File: 1 page(s) / 13K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

von Gutfeld, RJ: AUTHOR

Abstract

Gottsleben and Stuke [*] describe a method for building up the thickness of a metal line defined by local pyrolysis of an appropriate gas using a focused laser to provide the localization of the gas decomposition and, hence, the region of metal patterning. In the initial step of this reference, the laser causes pyrolytic deposition of tungsten onto the substrate at the position of focus. The substrate is contained in a chamber in which a partial pressure of tungsten hexafluoride is maintained as the precursor gas from which the metal deposition is derived. Subsequently, this line, which is quite thin, is increased in thickness by using a current to heat up the line to produce a localized pyrolysis via resistive heating of the line.

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Method for Making Circuits on Circuit Boards

Gottsleben and Stuke [*] describe a method for building up the thickness of a metal line defined by local pyrolysis of an appropriate gas using a focused laser to provide the localization of the gas decomposition and, hence, the region of metal patterning. In the initial step of this reference, the laser causes pyrolytic deposition of tungsten onto the substrate at the position of focus. The substrate is contained in a chamber in which a partial pressure of tungsten hexafluoride is maintained as the precursor gas from which the metal deposition is derived. Subsequently, this line, which is quite thin, is increased in thickness by using a current to heat up the line to produce a localized pyrolysis via resistive heating of the line.

We describe a method for making portions or possibly entire low- end circuits, but without the use of a laser. Eliminating the laser greatly simplifies the process and expands the range of applicability of the proposed method. In our scheme, pattern alignment becomes simplified and mass production of entire circuits becomes a possibility. The initial pattern on the substrate or circuit board is made using a stamping dye in conjunction with a conducting ink. For some inks, it may be necessary to heat the substrate slightly to drive off the binders. This can be done on a heater stage, if necessary. Current probes can be connected to the ends of the lines. Alternatively, a commoning bar can be provided in the stamping dye pattern to interconnect all ground leads while individual or, possibly, a number of lines can be interconnected for the "hot lead". The boa...