Browse Prior Art Database

Substrate Lifting and Positioning Device

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000036972D
Original Publication Date: 1989-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Jan-29
Document File: 2 page(s) / 40K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Beaumont, G: AUTHOR

Abstract

This article describes a device for lifting and rotating a semiconductor circuit substrate during manufacturing and testing that eliminates the use of mechanical grabbers and turning tables and the accompanying risk of physical damage to the substrate. The device could be used where any flat elements have to be carefully handled, such as planar boards, wafers, semiconductor substrates, circuit cards, etc.

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Substrate Lifting and Positioning Device

This article describes a device for lifting and rotating a semiconductor circuit substrate during manufacturing and testing that eliminates the use of mechanical grabbers and turning tables and the accompanying risk of physical damage to the substrate. The device could be used where any flat elements have to be carefully handled, such as planar boards, wafers, semiconductor substrates, circuit cards, etc.

The substrate lifting device consists of a plate-like holder 1 having a central opening 2 facing a substrate 3 to be manipulated. Tube 4 communicates with the opening in the holder and is connected to an air pressure source. A rack and pinion mechanism 5 is operatively connected to the holder 1 and centrally located thereon. At each underside corner of the holder, there is a dependent corner bracket 6.

These brackets prevent substrate 3 from lateral movement with respect to holder 1 during rotation of the holder. In operation, holder 1 is positioned over substrate 3 and by activating the pressure source, the substrate is attracted to and attaches itself to holder 1 by the Bernoulli-effect. The substrate is thus moved out of contact with surface 7 upon which it was resting, as shown in Fig.
2.

The rack and pinion mechanism can then be activated to rotate holder 1 and the attached substrate to any desired position, as shown by arrows in Fig. 1. By decreasing air pressure in tube 4 and thus opening 2, the substrate is releas...