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Complementary Heterojunction Bipolar Circuit

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000036979D
Original Publication Date: 1989-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Jan-29
Document File: 2 page(s) / 47K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Knepper, RW: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

The complementary bipolar circuit described in this article offers the attractive features of a CMOS (Complementary Metallic Oxide Semiconductor) circuit, which employs both p-channel and n-channel devices on the same silicon substrate, while avoiding the adverse saturation effects encountered with prior bipolar designs.

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Complementary Heterojunction Bipolar Circuit

The complementary bipolar circuit described in this article offers the attractive features of a CMOS (Complementary Metallic Oxide Semiconductor) circuit, which employs both p-channel and n-channel devices on the same silicon substrate, while avoiding the adverse saturation effects encountered with prior bipolar designs.

The CMOS 3-way NAND circuit shown in Fig. 1 exhibits a number of desirable circuit design features such as a simple topology, zero standby power, a full signal swing, noise immunity and an attractive power delay product. Bipolar technology, on the other hand, has not been able to use the standard CMOS NAND circuit topology because of saturation problems occurring in devices connected in series, e.g., NPN devices 1, 2, and 3, and saturation problems caused by a full output swing, even for devices connected in parallel, e.g., PNP devices 4, 5, and 6.

(Image Omitted)

The saturation problem is resolved by the use of heterojunction bipolar collector-base junctions, as employed in the complementary heterojunction bipolar NAND circuit shown in Fig. 2. This circuit can be built in silicon-based or other semiconductor technology. By utilizing a heterojunction (H) for the collector-base junctions but a standard homojunction for the base-emitter junctions, it is possible to skew the Vb-c bias curve relative to the Vb-e bias curve, i.e., the Vb-c curve can be raised by 200-300 mV (or more) above the Vb- e curve fo...