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Multilayered Window Hierarchical Ownership

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000037013D
Original Publication Date: 1989-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Jan-29
Document File: 2 page(s) / 36K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Franklin, SM: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

This article describes a method for efficiently searching window c for application specific data with a minimal effort necessary to execute the search. Multilayered Window Hierarchical Ownership is achieved by imposing artificial parentage and ownership hierarchies on the window chains in order to encapsulate the domain of the search. This search encapsulation intelligently localizes the area of the search to only those chains where application data actually resides, eliminating windows and subsequent chains where searching is not required.

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Multilayered Window Hierarchical Ownership

This article describes a method for efficiently searching window c for application specific data with a minimal effort necessary to execute the search. Multilayered Window Hierarchical Ownership is achieved by imposing artificial parentage and ownership hierarchies on the window chains in order to encapsulate the domain of the search. This search encapsulation intelligently localizes the area of the search to only those chains where application data actually resides, eliminating windows and subsequent chains where searching is not required.

In an application which uses a windowing system such as the IBM Presentation Manager, it is often necessary to display data to users in an interface consisting of many windows and subwindows. It is also possible to create and make use of windows that are not visible to the user for the purpose of storing and maintaining data specific to the application. Creating non-visible windows for the purpose of maintaining protocol conversations between cooperating applications is one example of the use of non-visible windows. Windowing systems like the IBM Presentation Manager impose ownership and parentage hierarchies which is a tree-like owner relationship for all the windows that are created by an application. These system defined ownership hierarchies are not created nor kept by the system with the design and requirements of a specific application in mind, but rather are organized for opera...