Browse Prior Art Database

Self-Correcting Anti-Dyslexic Font

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000037074D
Original Publication Date: 1989-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Jan-29
Document File: 2 page(s) / 20K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Ennis, RL: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

A font is disclosed which helps people with learning disabilities, specifically a changeable font which helps dyslexics. This font implemented in a computer is programmed in such a way that over the course of time and with repeated use, the letters change, and deviation from "normal" letters is reduced, until the dyslexic student can consistently recognize "normal" letters.

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Self-Correcting Anti-Dyslexic Font

A font is disclosed which helps people with learning disabilities, specifically a changeable font which helps dyslexics. This font implemented in a computer is programmed in such a way that over the course of time and with repeated use, the letters change, and deviation from "normal" letters is reduced, until the dyslexic student can consistently recognize "normal" letters.

Five to ten percent of school-age children are dyslexic. This neurologically- based reading disorder is manifest, in part, by the inability to differentiate certain subtle spatial relationships in the characters of written language. For English, this includes confusion of directional orientation in letters such as "q" and "p", "b" and "d", "m" and "w", as well as "Z" and "N". Note that these letters can be related to each other by symmetry transformations, such as rotation and mirroring.

A new font which induces certain asymmetries in hard-to-distinguish characters, such as those mentioned above, could significantly enhance a dyslexic's ability to learn to read. With this font new characters are introduced and modified in order to arrive at a set that is accepted by the spatial dyslexic without ambiguity. Below are example asymmetries in our new font:

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We note that in certain pictorial languages (Japanese, etc.), dyslexia does not exist. This may be due, in part, to the fact that no character can be translated to another by simple symmetry oper...