Browse Prior Art Database

Power Control and Diagnostic Function Network

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000037142D
Original Publication Date: 1989-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Jan-29
Document File: 5 page(s) / 94K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Agha, SA: AUTHOR

Abstract

This network provides a simple power control mechanism along with the diagnostic capability, and it allows for power control for local and remote towers (shown in Fig. 1). It also has the ability to analyze the power state of both the towers and eliminates the use of LEDs to display power faults. With this implementation, the Control Panel (see Fig. 2) becomes the focal point for system power control.

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Power Control and Diagnostic Function Network

This network provides a simple power control mechanism along with the diagnostic capability, and it allows for power control for local and remote towers (shown in Fig. 1). It also has the ability to analyze the power state of both the towers and eliminates the use of LEDs to display power faults. With this implementation, the Control Panel (see Fig. 2) becomes the focal point for system power control.

This network provides for all the necessary function needed to control system power with a small number of I/O lines. It also allows flexibility to be adapted to any power supply design because of its simplicity. Additional diagnostic bits could be added depending upon the number of power supply failures that need to be reported to the operator. It utilizes the diagnostic bits to report the remote tower power supply status to the operating system while the local tower is operational. In case of a power supply failure in the local tower, the diagnostic bits contain the local power supply failure information.

(Image Omitted)

Although the illustrated implementation is for a two-tower system, only (towers 1 and 2, Fig. 1), additional remote towers can be covered with this interface by: Adding more diagnostic bits

T2 Power-On becomes Tn Power-On, to all the remote

towers

T2 Power Complete becomes Tn Power Complete indication

for all the towers to be powered up

T2 Present still indicates that there is a least one

remote tower

Power Supply Interface:

(Image Omitted)

The Control Panel and Power Supply communicate on this interface to control power on/off and to pass status of the power supply. T1 is the local tower, and T2 is the remote tower. In Fig. 2:

+T1 Power-on: This line is provided to the power supply to initiate a power-on (or power-off). The line will be active after the Control Panel detects a power-on request. It will go inactive when a power-off request is received at the Control Panel or when the +T1 Power Complete signal is deactivated by the power supply (indicating an error condition exists).

(Image Omitted)

+T1 Power Complete: This line is active when the power supply is on. The line may be inactive because of a normal power off or because of a power fault condition.

1

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Diagnostic Bits 0, 1, 2: These three lines provide the coded information of the specific fault that has been detected by the power supply. It should be noted that if Tower 2 is attached, the diagnostic bits contain the information of the Tower 2 power supply as long as Tower 1 is powered on. The Control panel provides this information in case the Power status is requested. This capability enables the oper ating system to know the power status on Tower 2.

Reference: "Power Fault Codes" herein.

Power Supply Interface Operation: If the +T1 Power Complete signal is active within 6 seconds following a power-on request, the Power On indicator will be turned on. It should be noted that the Power On indicator...