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Optical Recognition of Damaged Passbooks in Self-Service Passbook Printers

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000037145D
Original Publication Date: 1989-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Jan-29
Document File: 4 page(s) / 86K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Fischer, L: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

For several years now passbook printers have been used by the majority of banks. These printers are operated by trained personnel that visually check the condition of the passbooks before introducing them into the printer.

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Optical Recognition of Damaged Passbooks in Self-Service Passbook Printers

For several years now passbook printers have been used by the majority of banks. These printers are operated by trained personnel that visually check the condition of the passbooks before introducing them into the printer.

This visual check is aimed at detecting:

bent or folded corners (so-called dog ears) on

pages to be printed;

partly folded pages;

(Image Omitted)

partly torn out and torn off pages;

totally missing pages; or

loose pages which are either in the wrong place or

which have come off the passbook cover.

This is to ensure that passbooks are printed in the correct position (column by column or line by line) and that the printer is not damaged by jammed passbooks.

The trained personnel acts so-to-speak as a filter which eliminates passbook defects and exchanges heavily damaged books for new ones.

As such check is generally not made in self-service passbook printers, damaged passbooks are frequently printed in the wrong lines or disrupt the printer by getting stuck in it.

(Image Omitted)

To overcome those problems, optical marks are provided at particular positions on the passbook pages. The position and depth of focus of these marks are scanned by an optical reader or scanner and compared with stored desired values. If the scanned marks are correctly posi- tioned, the passbook is fed through the printer. Alternatively, the passbook is rejected with the customer receiving a message that a particular defect has occurred. In response to such message, he may remove, for example, a dog-eared or folded page, as is normally done by the operating personnel.

Automatic optical recognition of damaged passbooks reduces the frequency of maintenance cycles. The customer is guided by messages telling him what defects are acceptable and when a passbook has to be exchanged for a new one. In addition, damage occurring during the handling of the passbook in the printer, such as tolerances in the feed path, are detected and may be corrected. There may also be a freely programmable tolerance range which each bank defines according to its special requirements. A recording means registering the number of faulty passbook tra...