Browse Prior Art Database

Error Correction Technique for Data Memory in Engineering Verification Engine

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000037147D
Original Publication Date: 1989-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Jan-29
Document File: 2 page(s) / 34K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Gabrielson, RM: AUTHOR

Abstract

Disclosed is a means for correcting transient data errors in an Engineering Verification Engine (EVE) simulation without special error correction hardware or reduction in the EVE's performance. The ability to correct transient data errors greatly reduces the simulation time lost due to such errors. The Engineering Verification Engine (EVE) is an enhanced version of the engine described in Proceedings of the IEEE, 74 (6) 850-860 (June 1986).

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 64% of the total text.

Page 1 of 2

Error Correction Technique for Data Memory in Engineering Verification Engine

Disclosed is a means for correcting transient data errors in an Engineering Verification Engine (EVE) simulation without special error correction hardware or reduction in the EVE's performance. The ability to correct transient data errors greatly reduces the simulation time lost due to such errors. The Engineering Verification Engine (EVE) is an enhanced version of the engine described in Proceedings of the IEEE, 74 (6) 850-860 (June 1986).

Without a correction scheme for data memory, simulation must be restarted each time a data memory error occurs. Restarting a large simulation model can require as long as twenty minutes, resulting in lost time equivalent to simulation of over sixty thousand 370 instructions. This method uses specialized microcode to exploit the redundancy of EVE's data memory, providing error correction without specialized correction hardware and without affecting EVE's performance in the absence of errors. The microcoded error correction requires only a small number of milliseconds, after which simulation can be resumed.

The figure on the preceding page shows the EVE logic processor data memory, Instruction operand fields 0 are: OP1, OP2, OP3, OP4, OP5, OUT. Data memory fields are: a, b, c, d, e.

EVE uses redundant data memory to gain simulation speed. Each of the five operand fields of EVE's logic instruction points to its own copy of simulation data so that data f...