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Laser Scribed Labyrinth Type Circuit for Circuit Board

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000037164D
Original Publication Date: 1989-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Jan-29
Document File: 4 page(s) / 186K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Chiles, TH: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

One conventional way of providing a circuit pattern on a circuit board substrate is to blanket plate or vapor deposit or otherwise apply a metal layer to the surface of a dielectric material to form a circuit board. Following this, some type of subtractive process is used to remove the metal from the areas where circuit lines are not desired, leaving metal at the desired circuit lines or pattern with the regions where the metal has been removed acting as a dielectric between the circuit lines.

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Laser Scribed Labyrinth Type Circuit for Circuit Board

One conventional way of providing a circuit pattern on a circuit board substrate is to blanket plate or vapor deposit or otherwise apply a metal layer to the surface of a dielectric material to form a circuit board. Following this, some type of subtractive process is used to remove the metal from the areas where circuit lines are not desired, leaving metal at the desired circuit lines or pattern with the regions where the metal has been removed acting as a dielectric between the circuit lines.

In one technique, a laser is utilized to scribe around each circuit line to be formed. This is depicted in Fig. 1 wherein a circuit board having a metal blanket deposited thereon is shown. A circuit

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pattern is scribed thereon by means of laser technology wherein the laser beam follows around the desired circuit pattern removing the metal shown in the areas shown in heavy outline 10, thus defining individual circuit pads and circuit lines 12 in the desired pattern with the desired connections between the pads and lines. This requires a great deal of laser manipulation and very extensive traversing of the scribe. The result is rather narrow circuit lines separated by very narrow dielectric spaces, with the narrow circuit lines being separated from very large nonfunctioning areas of metallization 14.

Fig. 2 shows an improved labyrinth design which is produced by laser scribing of a metallized circuit board. In this case, the laser scribes a labyrinth design of narrow bands 16 to separate very wide metal areas 18 which areas 18 act as conductors on which the required circuit elements can be mounted by surface mount technology (SMT) and pin-in-hole technology. The labyrinth circuit design is also capable of accommodating direct chip attach (DCA) technology. After lasing, additional plating can be supplied if required by electroless...